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californicatinq:

you are lying to me if you said that you didnt sing this in your head

“When someone loves you, the way they say your name is different.”

Anonymous (via udukogu)

Posted 20 hours ago With 126,268 notes

sno-cone:

Holy shit this is so cute

vomitburp:

There is literally no gif as perfect as this one

I interviewed a young anthropologist working with women in Mali, a country in Africa where women go around with bare breasts. They’re always feeding their babies. And when she told them that in our culture men are fascinated with breasts there was an instant of shock. The women burst out laughing. They laughed so hard, they fell on the floor.

They said, “You mean, men act like babies?”

Carolyn Latteier, Breasts, the women’s perspective on an American obsession

(via meadows-momma)

Posted 1 day ago With 144,859 notes

wifigodz:

id be more likely to kill a human than an animal

Posted 2 days ago With 22,956 notes

avatarjason:

Gandhi didn’t say this. Martin Luther King Jr didn’t say this. Jesus Christ didn’t say this. MEWTWO SAID THIS

bagofsocks:

bestofcardsagainsthumanity:

That about sums it up.

It even rhymes

kenobi-wan-obi:

staceythinx:

Fine art bodypainting byJohannes Stötter

this fucked me up

currentsinbiology:

Scientists solve the riddle of zebras’ stripes

A research team led by the University of California, Davis, has now examined why zebras have black and white stripes. Their answer is published April 1 in the online journal Nature Communications.

The scientists found that biting flies, including horseflies and tsetse flies, are the evolutionary driver for zebra’s stripes. Experimental work had previously shown that such flies tend to avoid black-and-white striped surfaces, but many other hypotheses for zebra stripes have been proposed since Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin debated the problem 120 years ago. These include:

  1. A form of camouflage
  2. Disrupting predatory attack by visually confusing carnivores
  3. A mechanism of heat management
  4. Having a social function
  5. Avoiding ectoparasite attack, such as from biting flies

The team mapped the geographic distributions of the seven different species of zebras, horses and asses, and of their subspecies, noting the thickness, locations, and intensity of their stripes on several parts of their bodies. Their next step was to compare these animals’ geographic ranges with different variables, including woodland areas, ranges of large predators, temperature, and the geographic distribution of glossinid (tsetse flies) and tabanid (horseflies) biting flies. They then examined where the striped animals and these variables overlapped.

After analyzing the five hypotheses, the scientists ruled out all but one: avoiding blood-sucking flies.

"I was amazed by our results," said lead author Tim Caro, a UC Davis professor of wildlife biology. "Again and again, there was greater striping on areas of the body in those parts of the world where there was more annoyance from biting flies."

Caption: UC Davis scientists have learned why zebras, like these plains zebras in Katavi National Park, Tanzania, have stripes. Credit: Tim Caro/UC Davis

FUCK I DIDN’T EVEN REALIZE THIS WAS FORESHADOWING UNTIL THIS MOMENT RIGHT NOW FUCK